3 Tips to Take Your Network Marketing Presentation to the Next Level!

Are you having trouble sponsoring prospects into your network marketing business? If you’re showing 10 presentations per week and NOT sponsoring at least 3 people out of those 10, you MUST read this.

Back when I started in the network marketing industry, I showed a bunch of presentations and I was able to sponsor a decent percentage of the people I showed. I can accredit my early success to this: I wasn’t THINKING about my presentation. I was just flat out EXCITED!

Tip #1: Are You Focusing On Your Presentation Too Much?

When you’ve shown a decent amount of presentations, you might tend to start analyzing your own presentations. You’ll start thinking about what you did say or what you DIDN’T say… (hint: your prospect doesn’t know if you skipped over something!)

You’ll start trying to add funny stories and facts that you’ve heard when you saw other distributors show the presentation. And you’re going to do everything but what you’re supposed to: relate to your prospect, transfer your excitement over to them, and get them started (or book the next appointment).

Tip #2: Ask Your Prospect More Questions!

I used to know my presentation so well, I could do it with my eyes closed… And sometimes I might as well have. I would talk so fast it would seem like I didn’t even take a second to BREATHE. I was so eager to get out all of the information, I forgot that there was a person sitting across from me.

You’re not talking to a camera. You’re not on TV. It’s NOT a one-way communication.

In order to relate to your prospect more, gain and KEEP their attention, and gain their trust (and partnership)… you need to LISTEN just as much if not MORE than you speak.

Ask your prospect questions as you go through your presentation. Even if they’re “yes questions” like:

- Does that make sense?

- Isn’t the compensation plan exciting?

But even better are the questions where you get to see what they’re thinking and see if you should even continue your presentation. Questions like:

- How would this extra income make a difference in your life?

- What do you feel about the support our team will be giving you?

- What are you looking for in a business?

Remember that this is a TWO WAY communication and you’re sponsoring rate will go through the roof!

Tip #3: DON’T Show the Presentation Yourself!

“But, wait! I thought we need to show the plan and duplicate our upline?!”

Sure. Sure. Sure… I know I’ve heard it, too. But here’s the in-your-face truth: not everyone can duplicate that!

Many people in your downline will not want to show presentations… So how can they grow their business? In the past I’d just hope that they gave me some referrals, I’d build a team under them, and find a leader in their group that WOULD show presentations. Then it wouldn’t matter if they were growing the business or not.

The problem is this: “Old-School” network marketing tells us that these people CAN’T be successful in network marketing. And, man, is that a load of JUNK!

So, how do they show the presentation WITHOUT showing the presentation? Two ways:

  1. Use a DVD. Pass it out to others with your card and contact info on it. Invite people to a group meeting or invite them to a 1-on-1 with you in someone’s living room. Slide the disc in and press ‘play’. And PRESTO! No more having to memorize the presentation.
  2. Use the Internet. (This is my personal favorite). In this day and age you can now use a website to show the plan for you. Learn how to “drive visitors to your website”, let the site do all of the work for you, and you’ll have an automated machine spitting out distributors for you all day long…

So, if you’re having trouble showing your network marketing presentations… just remember -

You’re not there to do a “perfect” presentation. Have fun, get excited, ask questions… and when all else fails, use technology… (wink wink)

Corporate Event Management – For Conference Presentations and More

Business events can often be stressful and difficult to organise, whether they are small conferences or big corporate events. A corporate event management company will help remove some of the stress involved when putting on these sorts of event. An event management consultant will help you plan the event while also providing advice and recommendations when choosing venues and locations.

When organising a conference or seminar it is important to keep it simple, relevant and interesting. There are many ways you can do this by improving your presentation skills so you can control and keep the attention of your audience or by involving the audience with handouts, demonstrations and tasks. A good corporate events management consultant will be able to guide you through every step from booking the venue, hiring equipment and arranging a schedule to helping run the event on the day itself.

For those of you who are not too confident when it comes to speaking in front of groups of people then presentation skills training might be needed. A good consultant will either be able to provide you with a course in presentation skills training or help you find someone who can. The training will show you how to make the best use of your slide show by sticking to the main points and using prompts to remind you of what to say. Most people take in a higher amount of information through imagery rather than words and you will also learn how to use this to your advantage.

Event management is a vital part of any corporate event and so it is a good idea to hire a company to take care of the management of your event. The amount of time and effort that it takes to organise a corporate event you are better off hiring someone to help with the event management. This will help you create a unique and innovative event on any sized budget.

The Benefits of Having Good Negotiation Skills

If you’re interested in the benefits of possessing good negotiation skills chances are you are a business person, seeking to improve your skills, a timid person, fed up with being at the bottom of the food chain, or the type of person who just likes learning new things.

Few people actually realize negotiating is nearly an every day part of life, the only thing which defines negotiation from “cutting a deal” is the perceived importance to the affected parties.

What exactly are good negotiation skills? We’ll explore this question in a manner a little more serious than negotiating “You can go out Friday night if you mow the yard”.

A good negotiator must be intelligent, which doesn’t mean you’re of Einstein IQ, sometimes just the opposite is true. A person must be intelligent enough to realize they are either ignorant of the subject, which is nothing to be ashamed about, nobody knows it all except a fool, or their knowledge is dwarfed by their opponent. One must be willing to research and perform his due diligence in order to understand the subject and be able to intelligently understand and converse about opponent’s proposals.

In order to become a good negotiator one must not only understand human emotions and behavior, but be able to perceive what emotion the opponent is experiencing, when they’re experiencing it and why. In theory negotiations should always be void of emotions, the “can’t take it personal” attitude, should always rule. However, who is negotiating; humans and humans have emotions, which some can control or hide better than others, but still experience. By analyzing your opponent, which a sharp negoiator will have a plan in place to extract reactions to certain questions or situations, you will be able to put yourself in your opponent’s place which could grant you insight to his motives and how to address them.

A great negotiator will maintain a reputation of being honest and fair, which doesn’t mean weak. Many inexperienced or arrogant people placed in the position of negotiating a matter or contract will maintain a staunch position of wanting everything their way, from all their demands to the temperature the air conditioner is set, which only creates an adversarial and confrontational atmosphere. Simple issues will become mammoth obstacles and it quickly becomes a “I’ll take my ball and go home” situation where everyone digs their heels in and refuses to bend.

The great negotiator will understand to arrive at a position both parties can live with, he must ultimately present a win – win situation and he’ll do everything in his power to prevent a confrontational atmosphere from being created.

I was once involved in a set of contract talks where the situation had become stalemated. The ground rules were any request for a recess had to be made onan alternating basis, in other words if the company was granted a recess they could not request another one until the union had used one.

I was taken off guard when the union chief negotiator suddenly requested an unexpected recess, then we just sat at the table doing nothing. When the company human resource manager returned to the table the union spokesman asked if he was alright. The man looked surprised and nodded his head yes. The union spokesman replied “Good, I could tell you weren’t feeling well so I called a recess.”

“I ate something bad at lunch,” the man replied. From that point on, because one negotiator displayed a human concern for the others well being over the importance of the contract talks, the logger head was broken and negotiations were quickly resolved.