How to Create Effective Presentation Slides

At some point in your professional career you may be called upon to make a presentation. Fortunately there is presentation software that is available that makes giving those presentations a fairly simple process. The key is in knowing how to create effective presentation slides.

In learning how to create effective presentation slides you need to put yourself in your audiences seat. Many presenters get so caught up in all of the bells and whistles of the technology that the heart of the presentation gets lost. These tips will help you keep your focus so your audience gets the most out of the presentation.

Text

Unless you are presenting a slide show of your latest vacation pictures you are going to be using text on your presentation slides. You will need to make sure that the text you use is easy to read for the people that are viewing your presentation.

The size of the font will depend on how large the room is, how far away the audience is, and how large the screen you are projecting on. You need to make sure that the font you choose is easy to read for the people in the back row of the room.

You also need to make sure that you do not overload your slide with text. It is a natural tendency of people to read the slide that is on the screen. If they are reading the slide while you are speaking, they will miss what it is you are saying.

The other danger of too much text is that you may fall into the trap of reading your slides. It is much better to include bullet points or short lines to highlight the major points you are making.

The final thing you absolutely must do is check your text for spelling and grammar mistakes. You do not want your audience to be so focused on small mistakes that it distracts them from your presentation. Read the text on your slides several times, and them ask someone else to proofread your work.

Background

Use a simple background to add interest to your slides. A subtle background can make your presentation look more professional. If there is a design on your background, make sure that it is consistent across all of your slides. Using too many different backgrounds looks amateurish, and can appear as if you are just showing off your ability to find different backgrounds.

Your background should compliment the text you are using. If the background is too “busy” it will detract from your text. You also want to make sure that the shade of the background enhances the text and does not mask it. Make sure your text is easy to read. If your audience has to strain to see what is written they will stop paying attention to the presentation.

Graphics / Animations

Graphics can add interest to your slides, and if done well they can really enhance the presentation. However, if you do not choose your graphics wisely they can turn your professional presentation into a mess.

First, your graphics should be appropriate and relevant to the topic. If you are speaking on a new product line, it would be appropriate to include images of some of the products. It would not be appropriate to have your slide cluttered with photos of dogs and flowers.

If you are presenting data, a graphic of a bar graph or a pie chart is much preferred to using a table of raw data. The graphics will make your point, while the data chart will be hard to read, and you will end up losing your audience.

Layout

In general, when you lay your slides out, remember the axiom that “less is more.” Keep your slides simple and uncluttered. Make sure that everything that is on the slide serves a purpose and is easy to understand. Look at your slides not only as the presenter, but also as an audience member.

Learning how to create effective presentation slides is a skill that can enhance your professional reputation. By learning to do professional quality presentations you will be perceived as an expert in the area you are presenting on. Continue working to refine this skill and watch your reputation grow.

Shutter louvre size: Why does it matter?

The right size for your home will depend on a few factors, such as the climate you live in and the type of shutters you have installed.

In warmer climates, it is important to have larger louvres for shutters, as they allow more air to circulate and keep your home cool. In colder climates, you will want smaller louvres so that the heat stays in your home. The size of the louvres also affects how much sunlight comes into your home. Larger louvres let in more light while smaller ones block out more sunlight. This can be a good or bad thing, depending on your needs.

If you are looking for privacy, then you will want to go with smaller louvres. They will help keep prying eyes from seeing inside your home. If you don’t mind people being able to see into your house, then bigger louvres are a better option. They will let in more light and make your home feel brighter and more open.

The size of the shutter louvre is an important consideration when choosing new timber or PVC plantation shutters in Sydney for your home. Make sure to think about how you want your home to look and what functions the shutters will need to serve. Talk to a professional about which size would be best for you and your home.

Different sizes of louvres available for shutters:

37mm
50mm
63mm
75mm
100mm

The most popular sizes are 37mm and 50mm, but it really depends on the look you are going for and the amount of privacy you need. 63mm and 75mm louvres are starting to become more popular as people want bigger windows that let in more light. 100mm louvres are mostly used for commercial properties or very large windows.

If you are not sure what size louvres you need, speak to a professional about getting fitted with the right shutters for your home. Shutter louvre size can make a big difference in terms of comfort and efficiency, so it is definitely worth taking the time to get it right.

The Benefits of Having Good Negotiation Skills

If you’re interested in the benefits of possessing good negotiation skills chances are you are a business person, seeking to improve your skills, a timid person, fed up with being at the bottom of the food chain, or the type of person who just likes learning new things.

Few people actually realize negotiating is nearly an every day part of life, the only thing which defines negotiation from “cutting a deal” is the perceived importance to the affected parties.

What exactly are good negotiation skills? We’ll explore this question in a manner a little more serious than negotiating “You can go out Friday night if you mow the yard”.

A good negotiator must be intelligent, which doesn’t mean you’re of Einstein IQ, sometimes just the opposite is true. A person must be intelligent enough to realize they are either ignorant of the subject, which is nothing to be ashamed about, nobody knows it all except a fool, or their knowledge is dwarfed by their opponent. One must be willing to research and perform his due diligence in order to understand the subject and be able to intelligently understand and converse about opponent’s proposals.

In order to become a good negotiator one must not only understand human emotions and behavior, but be able to perceive what emotion the opponent is experiencing, when they’re experiencing it and why. In theory negotiations should always be void of emotions, the “can’t take it personal” attitude, should always rule. However, who is negotiating; humans and humans have emotions, which some can control or hide better than others, but still experience. By analyzing your opponent, which a sharp negoiator will have a plan in place to extract reactions to certain questions or situations, you will be able to put yourself in your opponent’s place which could grant you insight to his motives and how to address them.

A great negotiator will maintain a reputation of being honest and fair, which doesn’t mean weak. Many inexperienced or arrogant people placed in the position of negotiating a matter or contract will maintain a staunch position of wanting everything their way, from all their demands to the temperature the air conditioner is set, which only creates an adversarial and confrontational atmosphere. Simple issues will become mammoth obstacles and it quickly becomes a “I’ll take my ball and go home” situation where everyone digs their heels in and refuses to bend.

The great negotiator will understand to arrive at a position both parties can live with, he must ultimately present a win – win situation and he’ll do everything in his power to prevent a confrontational atmosphere from being created.

I was once involved in a set of contract talks where the situation had become stalemated. The ground rules were any request for a recess had to be made onan alternating basis, in other words if the company was granted a recess they could not request another one until the union had used one.

I was taken off guard when the union chief negotiator suddenly requested an unexpected recess, then we just sat at the table doing nothing. When the company human resource manager returned to the table the union spokesman asked if he was alright. The man looked surprised and nodded his head yes. The union spokesman replied “Good, I could tell you weren’t feeling well so I called a recess.”

“I ate something bad at lunch,” the man replied. From that point on, because one negotiator displayed a human concern for the others well being over the importance of the contract talks, the logger head was broken and negotiations were quickly resolved.