Finding Cool Presents For All Your Family and Friends

Is it your best friend’s birthday? Maybe it is your anniversary in a relationship or marriage. In any case, most people have a hard time finding cool presents for those that they care about. It really should not be that hard if you follow the tips set forth below.

First, make a list of those people for whom you would like to buy a gift. Think hard about where these people fit into your life. Some of these people may be very close to you. You mutually know each other and what each of you enjoy doing. Others on your list may not be as close, such as a brand new friend or your boss. Even though you do not have a closeness with them, you may decide to keep them on the list. You really do not have to put much thought in finding cool presents for these people. Just get them something that most people like and you will hit it right most of the time.

On the other hand, those on your list that are close to you require a little more thought when choosing the right gift. When choosing cool presents for these folks, you need to review what they like to do, such as their hobbies. Then, make a mental note of what they have already and what they need in relation to a certain hobby. Of those things they still need, figure out which items you can afford, choose the one of those the recipient needs the most and buy it. In other words, if your friend or family member is into astronomy, do not by them a telescope if they already have one. Be practical when choosing your gifts.

After you have made your list, it is time to go shopping. However, why get in the car and go to the mall when you can shop online from the comfort of your own home. Most of the popular stores (Best Buy, K-Mart, Sears, Walmart, etc) also have a website where you can buy their products. Often, these stores have deals that are only good through the website. In other words, you can not get the same deal if you walk into the store.

There are also businesses, such as kippsmart.net, that are strictly online that are worth checking. You can often find better deals online than you can when you physically go to the mall. There is a shipping charge. However, when you consider the cost of gas and your time, you can still save a great deal when you shop for cool presents online.

Sellers Completely Control Which Short Sale Offers Get Presented to Lender (Or Not) – Surprised?

In the course of my speaking to and networking with short sale practitioners in numerous markets across the nation I regularly encounter those who have a completely false impression with respect to who owes which duties to whom in the course of a short sale transaction. More specifically, many agents (both on the selling and buying sides of transactions) erroneously think that ALL short sale offers must be presented to lenders – nothing could be further from the truth!

While all real estate law is subject to individual State legislation and interpretation, and while several areas of law come into play in the course of a real estate transaction (e.g.: contract law, agency law, etc.) there are general principles and practices that can be said to apply. Generally speaking, the laws work like this:

· The listing agent for a property owes their fiduciary duties (care, confidentiality, obedience, accountability, loyalty, and disclosure) to the principal/client, who is virtually always the OWNER of the property.

· ALL offers must be presented to the OWNER of the property.

· The OWNER decides which offer(s) to accept, reject, or counter, based solely on the OWNER’S personal criteria, which may, or may not be price (e.g.: A fast sale may be more important to the owner than a top dollar sale.Similarly, a cash, “as-is” offer may be perceived by the owner to be a better bet than a higher priced offer that has to go through financing and inspection approvals).

For some reason, I find that a very large number of practitioners treat Short Sale transactions as if they were already REO transactions. Such confusion leads to wrong decisions with respect to the presentation of offers, and complicates and prolongs an all too often already complicated and time consuming process. Given these general principles, and in order to answer the question of whether all offers must be presented to a short sale lender, let’s explore the differences between Short Sale and REO/Bank Owned transactions

In an REO transaction the lender has already foreclosed on the property, which means that the LENDER is the OWNER of the property. If we apply the three general principals outlined above to an REO transaction we see that:

· The listing agent for the property owes their fiduciary duties to the LENDER.

· ALL offers must be presented to the LENDER.

· The LENDER decides which offer(s) to accept, reject, or counter, based on the LENDER’S own criteria.

In a Short Sale transaction, while the lender may have initiated the foreclosure process, the BORROWER is still the OWNER of the property. If we apply the three general principals outlined above to a Short Sale transaction we see that:

· The listing agent for the property owes their fiduciary duties to the BORROWER (not the lender).

· ALL offers must be presented to the BORROWER (not the lender).

· The BORROWER (not the lender) decides which offer(s) to accept, reject, or counter, based solely on the BORROWER’S personal criteria, which may, or may not be price (e.g.: In the case of a short sale situation, where interest, fees, and legal costs continue to accrue until the property is sold, a fast sale may be more important to the borrower than a top dollar sale. Similarly, a cash, “as-is” offer may be perceived by the borrower to be a better bet than a higher priced offer that has to go through financing and inspection approvals).

Clearly, in the case of a Short Sale, the agent works for the borrower and the borrower makes the decisions as to which offer(s) to accept, reject, or counter. Once a decision to accept an offer is made by the BORROWER, only then is the offer forwarded to the lender. The transaction proceeds as does any other with respect to subsequent offers that may come in – once an offer is accepted, the borrower is “under contract” (subject to third party approval by the lender) and they do not continue to entertain offers. Yes, they may accept an offer as a “back-up,” but a back-up offer only comes into play when/if the initially accepted offer falls apart, and only then would it be forwarded to the lender.

The lender is merely a third party “approver” of the transaction – they are not “a party to” the transaction. This is an important distinction! The lender simply has the right to reject, or accept the offers that the borrower chooses to forward. You must remember that a short sale is a completely voluntary attempt by a borrower to avoid a foreclosure – a borrower does not have to opt for a short sale. That being the case, if a borrower is under no obligation to even attempt a short sale, how in the world could it be said that a lender has a right to be presented an offer?

Now that you understand the borrower’s obligation to present offers vis-à-vis the lender, let’s shift gears and specifically focus on the short sale listing agent by first asking some questions about the general obligations of real estate agents to their clients, and then extrapolating the answers to short sale agents specifically.

Generally speaking, would it ever be tolerated for the agent of a client to act AGAINST the best interests of that client? Would it ever be tolerated for the agent of a client to act on behalf of a party who was acting expressly AGAINST the interests of their client? The answers of course are that, “Such acts would never be tolerated!”

That said, how could it be possible for the agent of a borrower to be compelled to work for the lender? Isn’t the lender working for THEIR OWN best interests, and not those of the borrower?

Clearly, the lender is working for their own best interests, which are directly adverse to the borrower’s interests (after all, the lender is either in the process of, or threatening to foreclose on the borrower’s property, which is about as adverse a situation as there is). Given the nature of an agent’s fiduciary duties to their clients, the agent for a borrower MUST do all that is legally within the scope of their representation to PROTECT the borrower from the lender and to advocate on behalf of the BORROWER’S position, not the position of the lender. There is nothing wrong with this – this is exactly what an agent is hired to do!

Now that it’s been explained to you, doesn’t it make sense?

Do you see how you have been mistaken if you thought that all short sale offers had to be presented to the lender? If you are a listing agent, do you see how presenting all short sale offers to the lenders could constitute a breach of your fiduciary duties to your clients? If you are a buyer’s agent, do you see that you have absolutely no right whatsoever to DEMAND that your buyers’ short sale offers be presented to lenders?

The bottom line is this: A borrower has no obligation to present all short sale offers to a lender, which means that a borrower’s agent has no obligation to present all short sale offers to a lender, which means that a buyer’s agent has no right to demand their short sale offer be presented to the lender. To transact under any other premise is to misunderstand the process completely.

Shutter louvre size: Why does it matter?

The right size for your home will depend on a few factors, such as the climate you live in and the type of shutters you have installed.

In warmer climates, it is important to have larger louvres for shutters, as they allow more air to circulate and keep your home cool. In colder climates, you will want smaller louvres so that the heat stays in your home. The size of the louvres also affects how much sunlight comes into your home. Larger louvres let in more light while smaller ones block out more sunlight. This can be a good or bad thing, depending on your needs.

If you are looking for privacy, then you will want to go with smaller louvres. They will help keep prying eyes from seeing inside your home. If you don’t mind people being able to see into your house, then bigger louvres are a better option. They will let in more light and make your home feel brighter and more open.

The size of the shutter louvre is an important consideration when choosing new timber or PVC plantation shutters in Sydney for your home. Make sure to think about how you want your home to look and what functions the shutters will need to serve. Talk to a professional about which size would be best for you and your home.

Different sizes of louvres available for shutters:

37mm
50mm
63mm
75mm
100mm

The most popular sizes are 37mm and 50mm, but it really depends on the look you are going for and the amount of privacy you need. 63mm and 75mm louvres are starting to become more popular as people want bigger windows that let in more light. 100mm louvres are mostly used for commercial properties or very large windows.

If you are not sure what size louvres you need, speak to a professional about getting fitted with the right shutters for your home. Shutter louvre size can make a big difference in terms of comfort and efficiency, so it is definitely worth taking the time to get it right.